The Kessler Family Haggadah

You Don't Have to Be Jewish to Celebrate Freedom

Passover is a Jewish holiday, but it isn't just for Jews. We welcome our non-Jewish brothers and sisters to our celebration of liberation. Liberation from oppression is always a deep concern of Jews, because of our history. But Jews are not the only people who suffer under the yoke of oppression. We invite our friends and family to share this night with Jews all over the world, as we take this opportunity to celebrate our freedom and pray for the freedom of all those who suffer, wherever and whoever they may be.

Tonight, rather than speak of Egypt during the course of this Seder, we'll use the name Mitzrayim instead. The term Mitzrayim derives from the root tza-r, "narrow, "meaning literally "from the narrows." The violent events of history have given Mitzrayim a sense of global consciousness so that we may refer to every place and any place in the world where people have been (or still are) persecuted.

We invite our friends, family, and community to share this night with Jews all over the world, as we take this opportunity to deeply feel as if we had actually been enslaved in Mitzrayim and redeemed from Mitzrayim. In celebrating our freedom, we as Jews hold out to the world an historical event and model that captured the imagination and vigor of a people. It is by the power of our reenactment of this event and the power of our visualizations of freedom that we can pray for this exodus to occur for all of us, and for all those who suffer, wherever and whoever they may be.

Using the language of our day to explain the Exodus, the challenge for us is and will continue to be to create new interpretations, new midrashim, merging the old and new into a coherent story that can be passed onto our children. Central to an understanding of   Pesach is the commandment of      "vehigadeta le-vinkha" - you should tell your child about the Exodus. Matzah itself symbolizes the need for a dialogue between one generation and the next. And it is the children who are obligated as well, to ask questions according to their understanding. And all of this conversation must take place on the level of "emet"-truth. For if we have not spoken to our children on this night then we have not fulfilled the mitzvah of   "maggid"-telling. Some of us may think that we know all the details of the story and thus do not need to tell the story, but we must retell it to remind ourselves not only that freedom is possible but that in an unredeemed world we must continue to strive for liberation in both personal and national ways. And by our elaboration on the story -that it is not just about a Pharaoh way back when or even about the modern Pharaohs of our day, but about all the different ways we can be enslaved-we may all be deserving of praise.

A Story About Stories

So some people say God made men because He loves stories. And we tell the story of Passover every year before this holiday meal because this is the story of how we got to where we are. This is the story, as far back as we can remember, of our beginning.

THE SEDER

The lamb bone and the roasted egg are only to be displayed. The other foods are to be both displayed and eaten. Festival candles should also be placed on the table. Flowers add to the beauty.

As for the reading of the Haggadah, guests will read the parts in clockwise alternation, starting with the host and proceeding to his left.

HOST:

   Boruch HaBa! WELCOME!

Our feast of Passover is here. About this holiday, it is written: "And thou shalt tell thy child in that day, saying: It is because of that which was done...when I came forth out of Egypt." We gather together tonight as a family of families to remember the bondage of our ancestors, so that we, as sons and daughters, may be inspired to cherish the freedom we now have, to recognize the bondage of those who are not yet free, and to encourage our daughters and sons to help in the struggle to free all men and women. On these evenings, the bond of love and family reaches out from our homes - as from this gathering -  to unite us with all Jews in remembering and in hope.

We are an old people; our history reaches back over 4000 years. In that history, our forebears have seen bondage and freedom, trial and triumph, high achievements and terrible disasters; today, too, as we recline in the luxury of our freedom, let us not forget how deeply our brothers and sisters in other places yearn for the simple necessity of release from their bondage.

ALL:

     Without knowledge of our past, we cannot see our future.
     Without memory, we have no present.
     Without knowing what is flawed, how can we know what
     is whole?

1. CANDLELIGHTING

(Momentarily subdue the lights in the room for maximum effectiveness)

READER:

The light of Passover is the light of freedom; the hope of passover is the hope of freedom. Our ancestors suffered in the darkness of slavery and dreamed of their liberty; some of our brothers and sisters must yet do the same. In the flame of the Passover candle we celebrate the light of freedom, the light that gives life.

           
         
                               

BORUCH ATTO ADONAI ELOHENU MELECH HO'OLOM ASHER KIDD'SHONU B'MITSVOSOV V'TZIVONU L'HADLIK NER SHEL YOM TOV.

On Shabbat the normal candlelighting prayer is also recited:

           
         

BORUCH ATTO ADONAI ELOHENU MELECH HO'OLOM SHEHEHEYONU V'KIY'MONU V'HIGIONU LAZMAN HAZZEH.

2.     Kiddush - Wine

READER:

The joy of Passover is the joy of love; the hope of Passover is the hope of love. Our ancestors suffered the coldness of hate and dreamed of the warmth of human kindness and universal love. And then, after the long winter of their bondage, freedom burst forth upon them like spring. In the rich sweetness of this wine, we celebrate in kinship the love and faith that give life. Love, freedom, and faith in life - these have kept our people together, in the face of great odds, for four millenia. May the struggle to attain these and to keep them succeed for all people in our time, and in the time to come.

BORUCH ATTAH ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HA-OLOM BO-REY PI-RI HAGGOFEN

READER:
The Kiddush is a toast to this holiday in blessing the wine and the time passing. Come, honored friends, let us together drink the toast: L'chayim! To life! (All raise their cups, toast, and drink their wine.)

3.     Urhatz (Washing Hands)

READER:

Wash your hands without reciting the customary blessing. A cup of water is poured over each hand Three times.

4.     Karpas (Parsley)

READER:

Spring is here. The world is alive and new; the bonds of winter cold are broken. Nature is reborn and the earth feels free and young again. The trees are budding; behind the buds lie flowers. The surprise of the world is about to burst open.

In Mitzrayim, our ancestors awoke from their sleep in chains to the life of freedom; in the long wandering out of bondage, our people were reborn into a new life.

           
                           

BORUCH ATTAH ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HA-OLOM BO-REY PI-RI HA-AH-DA-MA

(Take the parsley, symbol of spring and hope, and dip it into the salt water, symbol of the bitterness and tears of our people, and eat it.)

5.     YACHATZ

(From the three   Matzos, the host takes the middle piece, breaks it in two, and wraps one of the halves in a napkin. This special Matzah is called   the Afikomen and will serve as the final dessert of the supper. It is customary to hide the Afikomen so that the children may search and find it at the conclusion of the meal, and receive token gifts for its return.)

The host gives out matzah to everyone and holds up a piece and says:

HOST:

             
 

HO LACH-MO AN-YO, DEE A-CHO-LOO AV-HO-SO-NO B'AR-O D'MEETZ-RA-YEEM.

ALL:

This is the bread of affliction, the simple bread which our
ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat
with us. Let all who are enslaved become free. Let all who are oppressed
become liberated.

READER:

The Seder is different from the feast of any other holiday. At the Seder, the feast itself is symbolic: the special foods and the special ways of eating them all carry meanings beyond the usual. What are these meanings? Let us begin by asking the proper questions; only then can we give proper answers about the meaning of Pesach, of Passover.

6.     KASHAS (Questions)

(The youngest child capable of asking - or else apportion parts among the boys and girls present - should say to the host (who will answer), "We wish to ask you the four questions.")

CHILDREN:

Why is this night different from all other nights?

MAH NISH-TA-NA HA-LAI-LAH HA-ZEH, MI-KOL HA-LEY-LOT?

1.On all other nights we eat both bread and matzah; Why on this night do we eat only matzah?


SHE-BI-CHOL HA-LEY-LOT AH-NU OCH-LEEN CHA-MAYTZ U-MAT-ZAH, HA-LAI-LAH HA-ZEH
KU-LO MAT-ZAH?

2.On all other nights we may eat all kinds of herbs; Why on this night do we eat especially bitter herbs?

SHE-BI-CHOL HA-LEY-LOT AH-NU OCH-LEEN SHI-AR YI-RA-KOT, HA-LAI-LAH HA-ZEH KU-L0 MA-ROR?

3.On all other nights we do not usually dip our food in anything at all; Why on this night do we dip food twice?

SHE-BI-CHOL HA-LEY-LOT AYN AH-NU MAT-BEE-LEEN AH-FEE-LOO PA-AM EH-CHAT, HA-LAI-LAH HA-ZEH SHI-TAY FI-AH-MEEM?

4.On all other nights we eat either simply or in festivity; Why on this night do we celebrate with such special festivity?

SHE-BI-CHOL HA-LEY-LOT AH-NU OCH-LEEN BAYN YOSH-VEEN U-VEYN MI-SU-BEEN, HA-LAI-LAH HA-ZEH KU-LA-NU Mi-SU-BEEN?


7. ANSWERS

HOST:

Your questions are good questions. In order to answer them properly, we must first tell you the following story (maggid).

Jacob was a wanderer, he owned many flocks of sheep and traveled around to looking for good feeding ground for his sheep in Canaan.

One year there was a famine in Canaan and Jacob and all his children traveled down to Egypt. They settled there and did very well for a long time.

But one day there was a new Pharaoh in Egypt. The Pharaoh was the leader of Egypt. He thought that the Jewish people were very powerful and would rise against him. So he made all the Jewish people slaves. He commanded them to make bricks for their huge temples and pyramids.

This was very hard work and the Jewish people had a very bitter life.

One day Pharaoh became afraid and decided there were too many of the Jewish slaves and said that he would get rid of all the Jewish babies. One Jewish slave wanted to save her baby, Moses, and sent him down the Nile river in a little boat. Pharaoh's daughter saw the baby Moses floating down the river and took him into the palace.

No one knew he was Jewish.

Moses grew up in the Pharaoh's palace and everyone treated him like an Egyptian. Until one day they found out he was Jewish and he had to leave and flee into the desert.

In the desert, Moses saw a burning bush. The bush was burning but was NOT turning to ashes. When Moses moved closer to look at the bush he heard a voice:

I am the God of thy father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.

God tells Moses to return to Egypt and free the slaves. This will be his mission and God will help him.

Moses asked "When I speak to the children of Israel what should I say is your name ?"

And God said unto Moses "I AM THAT I AM". Gather the elders of Israel together and tell them that I will bring you out of slavery and back to Canaan, the land flowing with milk and honey.

Moses returned to Egypt and spoke with Pharaoh and asked him to "Let his people go". Pharaoh refused and Moses said that God will bring a a plague on his people.

THE PLAGUES

FROGS
And God caused frogs to cover the land of Egypt. They covered the ground so that you could not walk, or eat or sleep. The sounds of "rib-it, rib-it" were everywhere.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

GNATS
And God caused a mass of gnats to cover the Egyptians hair and homes. The Egyptians had to cover their mouths whenever they talked.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

WILD BEASTS
God caused a swarm of wild animals to run through the streets. People were scared of the animals and had to stay inside.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

LOCUSTS
And God caused a swarm of locusts that covered the sky and cast a shadow over Egypt. It destroyed all the remaining Egyptian crops, leaving no tree or plant standing.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

HAIL
And God caused the sky to rain down large hailstones that damaged the houses and hurt people if they went outside.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

DARKNESS
And God caused Darkness to cover the land that was so heavy the Egyptions could feel it. Intead of night turning to day, it was night, night and more night.

Pharaoh said to Moses, "Tell your God to stop the plague and you can go". But after the plague disappeared the Pharaoh said "I've changed my mind, your people will have to stay after all". Moses then said "there will be a new plague".

THE FIRST BORN
Finally, Moses said "There will be a plague that will make all the first born children go away". All the Jewish families were told to put lamb's blood over the door to their homes and the plague would Pass over their family. That is where the name of Passover comes from.

After this last plague the Pharaoh finally did let the Hebrew people leave Egypt and they were free.

READER:

Here are the Ten Plagues, as they are listed in the Bible story; for each, we diminish the wine in our cups, to give expression to our sorrow for the pain and loss which each plague exacted of other humans, even our ancient oppressors.

HOST:

(Pouring a drop of wine for each plague):


1. Blood
   2. Frogs
      3. Gnats
         4. Flies
            5. Diseased Cattle
               6. Boils
                  7. Hail 
                     8. Locusts
                        9. Darkness
                           10. Slaying of the First Born 

1. DOM      
   2. TZ'FAR-DAY-A         
      3. KI-NEEM       
         4. O-ROV       
            5. DE-VER      
               6. SH'CHEEN       
                  7. BO'ROD      
                     8. ARBEH        
                        9. CHO-SHECH      
                           10. MA-KAS B'CHO-ROS   
                                           

HOST:

Now that we know the story, let us go back and answer the four questions we were asked concerning the meaning of Passover. (Raises then Matzoh for all to see).

The First Question
On all other nights we eat both leavened and unleavened bread; why on this night do we eat only unleavened bread?

READER:

The Matzah is the symbol of the bread of slavery, the bread of poverty which our ancestors ate when they were slaves in Egypt. When Pharaoh told the Jews to leave they had to go very quickly. They did not have time to let the bread rise and they took it before baking it. In the desert, they carried the bread on their backs the sun baked the dough into matzah.

Let the Matzoh, the bread of our people's time of affliction and poverty, remind us of many of our people and others who are poor and hungry.

ALL:

Let us resolve to strive for the day when all will share in the joys
of freedom; when poverty will be no more, and when all people will equally
enjoy the fruits of freedom and justice. Let these be our goals as Jews.
           
                                  

BORUCH ATTO ADONAI ELOHENU MELECH HO'OLOM HAMOTZI LEHEM MIN HO'ORETZ.

(All present take take a piece of Matzoh together, pulling until it breaks, salt it, and eat it.)

HOST:

The Second Question
(Raises the bitter herb for all to see.)
On all other nights we can eat all kinds of herbs; why on this night do we eat only bitter herbs?

READER:

Moror is the bitter herb. The lives of the Jewish slaves were filled with bitterness and misery. The bitter taste of these herbs reminds us of the bitterness of all slavery. The Torah says, "And they made their lives miserable with hard labor in the making of bricks and mortar." We therefore dip the bitter herbs into the Charoset, the symbol of bricks and mortar, to remember their hardships. As we recall the suffering of Egypt so do we relive the oppression of every generation. The taste of Charoset, like the taste of freedom, sweetens bitterness and suffering.

ALL:

May the bitter herb we are about to eat make us sense the pain and
cruelty and thus value the pleasure of love.

(All present take horseradish, dip it into the Charoset, and eat it.)

HOST:

The Third Question
On all other nights we usually don't dip food; why on this night do we twice dip our food?

READER:

The first time we dipped parsley into salt, tasting the bitterness of tears and trying to erase that bitterness with the symbol of hope and spring.

Later we will dip the bitter herb into the sweet charoses as a sign that the sweet hope of freedom made the bitter slavery endurable.

(All present eat sandwich of Matzoh, Charoset, Bitter Herb)

HOST:

The Fourth Question
On all other nights we eat either simply or in festivity; why on this night do we celebrate, in festivity at our ease, like wealthy men and women?

READER:

When our ancestors were slaves they always had to stand at attention and could never have any fun. Tonite we can celebrate and recline as free people in luxury. Our wealth is that we can feast in liberty, with our friends and family about us.

In every generation each Jew should strive to imagine that he or she actually was a slave, that we suffered persecution at the hand of Pharaoh, that we listened to the summons of Moses and went forth from bondage to freedom. Only then can we remember that while we feast in our freedom, others are held in bondage, hungering. Let us drink a toast to freedom.

8. Dayenu  

Sing Dayenu: A Song of Joy and Thanksgiving

Dayenu - Short Version

 I-LU HO-TZI HOTZI-A-NU,
 HO-TZI-A-NU-MITZ-RA-YIM,
 HO-TZI-A-NU MITZ-RA-YIM
 DAYENU

 CHORUS:
 DAY-DAY-A-NU, 
 DAY-DAY-A-NU, 
 DAY-DAY-A-NU,
 DAY-A-NU, DAY-A-NU

 I-LU-NATAN, NA-TAN LA-NU,
 NA-TAN LA-NU ET HA-SHA-BAT,
 NA-TAN LA-NU ET HA-SHA-BAT
 DAYENU (CHORUS)

 I-LU NA-TAN, NA-TAN LA-NU,
 NA-TAN LA-NU ET HA-TO-RAH
 NA-TAN LA-NU ET HA-TO-RAH
 DAYENU (CHORUS)
     
 
         
 
               
 
Dayenu - Full Version

If He had brought us out from Egypt,              Ilu hotzianu mimitzrayim, 
and had not carried out judgments against them    v'lo asah vahem s'fatim,  
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had carried out judgments against them,     Ilu asah vahem s'fatim 
and not against their idols                       v'lo asah be'eloheihem,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had destroyed their idols,                  Ilu asah be'eloheihem,
and had not smitten their first-born              v'lo harag et b'choreihem,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had smitten their first-born,               Ilu harag et b'choreihem,
and had not given us their wealth                 v'lo natan lanu et mamonam,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had given us their wealth,                  Ilu natan lanu et mamonam,
and had not split the sea for us                  v'lo kara lanu et hayam,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had split the sea for us,                   Ilu kara lanu et hayam,
and had not taken us through it on dry land       v'lo he'eviranu v'tocho 
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!               becharavah,
                                                  dayeinu!

If He had taken us through the sea on dry land,   Ilu he'eviranu v'tocho becharavah,
and had not drowned our oppressors in it          v'lo shika tzareinu b'tocho,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had drowned our oppressors in it,           Ilu shika tzareinu b'tocho
 and had not supplied our needs                   v'lo sipeik tzorkeinu bamidbar
 in the desert for forty years                     arba'im shana,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu! 

If He had supplied our needs                      Ilu sipeik tzorkeinu bamidbar 
 in the desert for forty years,                     arba'im shana,
and had not fed us the manna                      v'lo he'echilanu et haman,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had fed us the manna,                       Ilu he'echilanu et haman,
and had not given us the Shabbat                  v'lo natan lanu et hashabbat,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had given us the Shabbat,                   Ilu natan lanu et hashabbat,
and had not brought us before Mount Sinai         v'lo keirvanu lifnei har sinai,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai,          Ilu keirvanu lifnei har sinai,
and had not given us the Torah                    v'lo natan lanu et hatorah,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had given us the Torah,                     Ilu natan lanu et hatorah,
and had not brought us into the land of Israel    v'lo hichnisanu l'eretz yisra'eil,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu!

If He had brought us into the land of Israel,     Ilu hichnisanu l'eretz yisra'eil,
and not built for us the Holy Temple              v'lo vanah lanu et beit hamikdash,
- Dayenu, it would have been enough!              dayeinu! 

9. SECOND GLASS OF WINE

(All raise glasses of wine and say:)

ALL:

     We shall never forget the slavery of Egypt.
     We shall never forget the cruelty of Pharaoh.
     We shall be mindful always of the constant exodus to freedom, in
     the inner world and in the outer world.
     We shall be mindful always of the evernew joy of liberation.

BORUCH ATTAH ADONOI ELOHENU MELECH HA-OLOM BO-REY PI-RI HAGGOFEN

(All drink.)

HOST:

There are other symbols on the Seder plate which have meaning for our Passover celebration.

10. LAMB (Pesach)

HOST:

(Host raises roasted lamb bone for all to see.)

What is the meaning of PESACH?

READER:

PESACH is the Passover lamb and is represented by the shankbone. On the night of the Exodus our fleeing ancestors held the first Seder feast in honor of their freedom. In each home a roasted lamb was eaten as the meal of redemption. The lamb was a reminder of the shepherd days when they were free and happy. In succeeding years they relived the Passover supper in all the lands in which they found their homes. To emphasize the luxury of liberty they reclined while eating and relaxed in the luxurious manner of free people.

11. ROASTED EGG

(Host raises the roasted egg for all to see.)

HOST:

What is the meaning of the roasted egg?

READER:

The roasted egg was a traditional appetizer of the ancient world, but to us, as to peoples of many other faiths, it is a symbol of rebirth and spring.

(Everyone is given an egg to eat)

12. THIRD CUP OF WINE

(Host holds up cup of wine.)

HOST:

And why do we drink wine at the Seder?

READER:

Wine has traditionally been part of the Seder and was served even to those in attendance who were most poor. As in all Jewish ceremonies of rejoicing -- the Sabbath, marriage, holidays, Bar and Bas Mitzvahs, and honoring the newborn - at the Seder, too, wine is used as a symbol of festivity.

As we celebrate our Passover Seder tonight, we affirm the bond of family of all Jews throughout the world. Almost all of them in America, Israel, England, France, Italy, South Africa, Australia, South America, Japan, India - almost all will observe the Passover tonight in honor of the freedom gained by our ancestors in Egypt. But many of our brothers and sisters, like those in Russia and Poland, may have to observe their Seders with caution. For them the feast serves as a spur to continue seeking their freedom, to continue pressing for a new exodus.

READER:

This is a holiday of universal historical meaning to all Jews, and it bears a message of freedom for all people. Throughout countless generations, our people has endured the savagery of unbridled hatred. Our children have been murdered by the millions. Nation after nation has sought to destroy us. But we have survived. Pharaoh is gone. Nebuchadnezzar is gone. Caesar is gone. Haman and Hitler are gone. Their empires have succumbed to fire or have crumbled into dust. But we are alive, and new enemies seek our destruction. The terror of persecution has made us feel the pain of humanity more sharply, and thus has bound us together as one people. The unity of the Jewish people arises out of a sense of common suffering, of shared survival, and therefore of a fundamental understanding of the human condition. And so it is with all Jews.

READER:

Even as we remember tonight what it was like when we were slaves in the land of Egypt; even as we think of our Jewish brothers and sisters who are still enslaved in various lands and places, so do we tonight remember people (whether they are Jews or not) who still suffer from slavery, hunger, and/or repression.

Again this year, as during the Exodus, we unite with the oppressed of our time:

  • The Palestinian people, whose destiny is so tragically intertwined with our own. And those Israeli people who are striving for peace amidst threats of destruction.

  • The people of New Orleans and the Gulf Region recovering from Hurricane Katrina.

  • The people of Iraq and all the people in the Middle East.

  • The people of China, North Korea, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

  • American Indians and indigenous peoples of Central and South America.

  • All those who are oppressed because of their gender or sexual preference.

  • All refugees, everywhere.

  • All those who are imprisoned for beliefs or practices which do others no harm.
  • ALL:

    Ever since we were slaves in Egypt, we have united with all those who
    strive TO BE, who seek liberation and freedom.
    

    13. FOURTH CUP OF WINE

    (All raise glasses of wine and say and sing:)

    ALL:

    We raise our third cup of wine and offer tribute to the universal
    spirit within all that gives us life and strives for freedom.
    
    (All sing)

                 

    HIN-NAY MATOV OO-MA-NA-EEM, SHEVET A-HEEM GAM YA-HAD.

    (How good and pleasant it is to gather together as brothers and sisters.)

    (All drink!)

    HOST:

    Let us eat.
    

    14. SUPPER

    (The Passover supper should begin with a hard-boiled egg and end with a sigh of contentment.)

    15. CUP OF ELIJAH

    READER:

    We have eaten the feast of our freedom and we have recalled the redemption of our people. But the dream of Passover transcends the Jew and reaches out to all people.

    Many centuries ago, there lived a prophet whose name was Elijah. He was a brave man who denounced the slavery of his day. Legend has it that he never died and that he will return some day to announce the coming of a new world in which war, human cruelty, and the enslavement of one person by another will find no place. In his image, he embodies the vision of all wise people, his spirit brings a message of hope for the future, brings faith in the goodness of humanity, and brings the assurance that freedom will come to all.

    HOST:

    Let us open the door and invite Elijah to enter and join with us as we drink the wine of our freedom.

    (Fill the cups with wine; open door; all rise)

    HOST:

    May the spirit of Elijah enter the hearts of all of us, and inspire us to build a good world, in which justice and freedom shall be the inheritance of all people.

    (All raise glasses of wine and say:)

       
       
           

         AY-LEE-YA-HOO HA-NO-VEE.
         AY-LEE-YA-HOO HA-TISH-BEE.
         AY-LEE-YA-HOO AY-LEE-YA-HOO AY-LEE-YA-HOO HA-GI-LA-DEE.
     
    We raise the last cup of wine and affirm our unity with all people in the
    struggles for human freedom.
    
         May slavery give way to freedom.
         May hate give way to love.
         May ignorance give way to wisdom.
         May despair give way to hope.
         Next year, at this time, may everyone, everywhere, be free!
    
    (All drink the last cup of wine; close door; be seated)

    16. AFIKOMEN

    When the main part of the meal is concluded but before desert, the children search for the Afikomen. Once it is found, the Afikomen is brought back, a prize is offered. The Afikomen is then broken into small bits and distributed to all as a dessert.

    The reward for the children finding the Afikomen can be as simple as the macaroons and other deserts for the meal - which can now be served.



    Passover Shopping List
    Matzah
    Grape juice and/or wine (enough for 4 glasses per person) 
    Gefilte fish 
    Horseradish 
    Parsley or lettuce 
    Eggs 
    Charoset ingredients (such as Apples, Walnuts and Cinnamon) 
    A Shankbone or a Beet
    Salad and salad dressing 
    Ingredients for Matzo ball soup 
    Ingredients for main course 
    Ingredients for side dishes 
    Ingredients for dessert (such as cake meal or potato starch) 
     Macaroons - 
    
    Candles 
    Flowers for centerpiece 
    A small Afikoman gift (the gift for finding the hidden Matzo)
    
    Other props for telling the story 
     - e.g. ping pong or practice golf balls
    
    Elijah's cup - clean